Thursday, April 27, 2017

#653 - Mark Brouhard


What a card: Mark Brouhard was entering his sixth and final season as a part-time outfielder and designated hitter for the Brewers when this card was issued.

My observation the front: "Huh," Brouhard seems to be saying, "so this is my final major league season."

More opinion from me: Brouhard's last name rhymes with "blowhard". I'm guessing no one teased him with that when he was growing up. He looks like he was always strong.

Something you might know: Brouhard's career highlight was going 3-for-4 with three RBIs and four runs scored in Game 4 of the 1982 ALCS against the Angels. The Brewers won the game and tied the series at 2-2 before going on to eliminate the Angels in Game 5.

Something you might not know: Brouhard played in Japan in 1986 and 1987 for the Yakult Swallows. Once, during a rain delay in 1986, Brouhard joined teammate and fellow American Leron Lee in putting on the team's mascot bird heads before pretending to hit home runs and belly-flopping on the tarp on the field.


My observation on the back: I totally forgot the Rangers' park used to be called Arlington Stadium.

The blog wants to speak now: The News category is updated.

Tuesday, April 25, 2017

#652 - Joe Nolan


What a card: Joe Nolan was entering his final major league season when this card was issued. At this point he was the backup to the backup as both Rick Dempsey and Floyd Rayford received more playing time at catcher than Nolan.

My observation on the front: Nolan seemingly did not go anywhere without those glasses.

More opinion from me: Take it from a young, avid collector between 1978-86: Nolan did not look like a ballplayer on any of his baseball cards. I think I was actually appalled when I pulled his 1979 Topps card.

Something you might know: Nolan took over for Johnny Bench behind the plate during the 1981 season. Bench was getting on in years and the Reds saved his legs by having him play third base. Nolan enjoyed his best hitting season that year, batting .309.

Something you might not know: Nolan, playing for the Braves, placed the finishing touch on ending Pete Rose's 44-game hitting streak when he caught Rose's foul tip for strike three on the Reds legend's final at-bat of the game.


My observation on the back: You can tell Nolan spent a lot of years (seven) in the minors with those sporadic at-bats in 1972 and 1975.

The blog wants to speak now: The News category is updated.

Friday, April 21, 2017

#651 - Jeff Russell


What a card: This is Jeff Russell's card after his first full season in the major leagues. The future closer appeared in 33 games in 1984 and started 30 of them, suffering a league-leading 18 losses.

My observation on the front: I'm certain I did not know Russell until he was with the Rangers and featured a mustache and beard. I've got to admit this card here is a bit alarming.

More opinion from me: You can tell this photo was taken the spring training before the 1984 season. No one smiles like that after going 6-18.

Something you might know: Russell was an All-Star closer for the Rangers in 1988 and 1989 and led the American League in saves with 38 in 1989.

Something you might not know: Russell's son, James, a relief pitcher for the Cubs, Braves and Phillies between 2010-16, is married to Nikki Witt, the daughter of former pitcher Bobby Witt. Bobby was a teammate of Jeff Russell's with the Rangers and A's.


My observation on the back: When you start the season 35-5, fans will want to come out to see your games.

The blog wants to speak now: The Pop Culture tab is updated.

Friday, April 14, 2017

#650 - Greg Luzinski


What a card: This is Greg Luzinski's final Topps card. By the time it was issued he had already retired at the age of 34.

My observation on the front: There are several cards of Luzinski that say, "he's a big boy." This is one of them.

More opinion from me: Luzinski is kind of two different people in my mind: the clean-shaven Phillies left fielder and the bearded, bespectacled White Sox designated hitter. But there was also that awkward period when he first arrived with the White Sox when he had some giant glasses but no beard.

Something you might know: Luzinski knocked in at least 120 runs twice with the Phillies and was runner-up in the NL MVP voting twice, to Joe Morgan in 1975 and George Foster in 1977.

Something you might not know: The distance and height of Luzinski's blasts were legendary. White Sox teammate Ron Kittle once said about Luzinski: "They're going to have to start a separate record book: 'most home run, roof'."


My observation on the back: Luzinski started the "Bull Ring" in Veterans Stadium in Philadelphia in 1976.

The blog wants to speak now: The Pop Culture tab is updated.

Wednesday, April 12, 2017

#649 - Sid Fernandez


What a card: This is Sid Fernandez's first Topps card. He first appears in a major card set in 1984 Donruss as a Los Angeles Dodger.

My observation on the front: This is a shot of Fernandez that would appear over and over on his cards. I'd say there's close to 25 different cards of Fernandez in a similar position.

More opinion from me: Still annoyed the Dodgers couldn't wait on Fernandez and dealt him for a middle reliever and a utility infielder (Carlos Diaz and Bob Bailor).

Something you might know: Fernandez is likely the most successful born-and-raised Hawaiian to play major league baseball.

Something you might not know: Fernandez famously wore the No. 50, after his native state, and the theme to "Hawaii 5-0" was played at Shea Stadium during his starts. The idea came from manager Tommy Lasorda, who gave Fernandez the uniform number when he was with the Dodgers.


My observation on the back: I admittedly know little about surfing or how fit you need to be, but it's difficult for me to picture Fernandez, who struggled with weight issues throughout his career, catching a wave.

The blog wants to speak now: The News category is updated.

Monday, April 10, 2017

#648 - Bob Jones


What a card: Bob Jones appeared in 64 games for the Rangers, his most major league playing time since he was with the Angels in 1976.

My observation on the front: Jones appears to be getting ready for his coaching career here.

More opinion from me: This card blew me away when I first saw it. There were very few players to appear on baseball cards who I had never heard of during the first half of the 1980s. He was one of them. And with the very generic sounding name of "Bob Jones" I half suspected Topps was putting me on.

Something you might know: Jones recently retired as the bench coach for the Rangers, participating in his last game in October 2016, his 50th and final season in major league ball.

Something you might not know: Jones has won more games as a minor league manager for the Rangers than anyone else.


My observation on the back: Jones led a howitzer group in Vietnam and is deaf in his right ear as a result.

The blog wants to speak now: The Pop Culture tab is updated.

Thursday, April 6, 2017

#647 - Rafael Ramirez


What a card: Rafael Ramirez was coming off his only All-Star season when this card was issued. But he didn't appear in the All-Star Game that year in Candlestick Park.

My observation on the front: Always nice to see the batting donut on a baseball card.

More opinion from me: Looking at the stats, Ramirez hit a lot better than I remember. I've probably mixed him up with another light-hitting shortstop. I do that a lot these days.

Something you might know: Ramirez was the Braves' starting shortstop for five seasons from 1982-86.

Something you might not know: When the Expos were trying to deal catcher Gary Carter during the 1984 offseason, they first offered him to the Braves. Montreal asked for Ramirez, pitchers Steve Bedrosian and Craig McMurtry and outfielder Brad Komminsk, but Atlanta thought that was too much. The Expos then traded Carter to the Mets.


My observation on the back: That's right, Bumgarner. Seven home runs twice.

The blog wants to speak now: The News category is updated.

Tuesday, April 4, 2017

#646 - Scot Thompson


What a card: Scot Thompson was entering his final major league season when this card was issued. He'd spent part of it with the Giants and the rest with the Expos after a deadline deal in August.

My observation on the front: That's a rather well-groomed fu manchu.

More opinion from me: If you want to be disturbed by people's hair choices, do an image search for "fu manchu".

Something you might know: Thompson was drafted in the first round by the Cubs in 1974 even though his high school, Knoch High School in Pennsylvania, didn't have a baseball team at the time.

Something you might not know: Thompson's father, Bill, played professional baseball in the 1950s in the Reds and Braves organizations, according to his son. But I can't find a reference to a Bill or William Thompson in minor league records (although I'd admit I'm a bit exhausted for research right now).


My observation on the back: My first thought when someone says cars is their hobby is "where do you put them?"

The blog wants to speak now: No it does not. Sorry, I'm beat.

Friday, March 31, 2017

#645 - Damaso Garcia


What a card: Damaso Garcia was coming off the most active season of his major league career when this card was issued. He appeared in a career-high 152 games and was fifth in the AL in at-bats with 633, wrapping out 180 hits.

My observation on the front: This is one time I wish a player was not wearing a cap. Garcia seems to have a ton of hair but he always had a cap on his head on his cards.

More opinion from me: During the 1980s, Garcia was lamented as one of the good players the Yankees let get away. But his career faded out pretty quickly by the end of the decade.

Something you might know: Garcia was part of the Blue Jays' touted middle infield of the mid-1980s, combining with the smooth-fielding Tony Fernandez.

Something you might not know: Garcia has limited use of speech and can't drive a car after he had a malignant brain tumor removed during the early 1990s. His son suffers from hemophilia and Garcia and his wife organized a baseball camp for hemophiliac children in the Dominican Republic.


My observation on the back: There are now three players with more home runs than Stan Musial accumulated (475) who never led the league in homers during a season. They are Rafael Palmeiro (569), Frank Thomas (521) and Gary Sheffield (509).

The blog wants to speak now: The News category is updated.

Wednesday, March 29, 2017

#644 - Mark Huismann


What a card: Mark Huismann appeared in 38 games in 1984, his rookie season. He also appeared in Game 1 of the Royals ALCS against the Tigers, which was an 8-1 loss for Kansas City.

My observation on the front: Anybody want a Coke?

More opinion from me: That scoreboard is charmingly quaint.

Something you might know: Huismann pitched mostly in relief for six teams, the Royals, Mariners, Indians, Tigers Orioles and Pirates for parts of nine seasons.

Something you might not know: Huismann nearly didn't make it to his major league debut. He was called up from Triple A Omaha and borrowed his parents' car to drive to Kansas City. But the car kept overheating and he had to pull over to the side of the road three times. He arrived at the park about a half hour before the game started. But he received the victory in relief against the Tigers.


My observation on the back: Huismann's birth site seems to be in dispute on his baseball cards. Topps and several minor league and oddball issues say he was born in Lincoln, Nebraska. But Donruss and Fleer say he was born in Littleton, Colorado.

The blog wants to speak now: The News category is updated.

Monday, March 27, 2017

#643 - Johnny Grubb


What a card: Johnny Grubb had completed his second season as the Tigers' sometimes-outfielder, sometimes-DH when this card was issued.

My observation on the front: Another card with "snow" on the front.

More opinion from me: Grubb wore glasses that made him look rather nerdy on his baseball cards throughout his career. But he could hit.

Something you might know: Grubb finished sixth the NL Rookie of the Year voting in 1973 when he broke in with the Padres.

Something you might not know: Grubb coached high school ball at his alma mater in Richmond, Va., for a period after his career. One of his players was former Padres and Orioles reliever Cla Meredith.


My observation on the back: He collects baseball cards!

The blog wants to speak now: The News category is updated.

Thursday, March 23, 2017

#642 - Dave Owen


What a card: This is Dave Owen's only Topps card. He has just one other card in a major set, and that was also in 1985, in the Donruss set.

My observation on the front: Owen looks super-lanky for a shortstop. The back lists him as 6-2, 170. That's lanky.

More opinion from me: I still knew just about every major leaguer in the game by 1985, but I have to admit, Dave Owen was never on my radar.

Something you might know: Owen is the older brother of the much more famous Owen, Spike.

Something you might not know: Owen's firing as the Royals third base coach in 2010 opened the door for Rusty Kuntz, who has been a base coach with Kansas City since 2011.


My observation on the back: Cobb certainly knew how to play, but I don't know if you want to pin "hero" on a guy who was known for being violent, vicious and racist. Interesting choice by Owen.

The blog wants to speak now: The News category is updated.

Tuesday, March 21, 2017

#641 - Rod Scurry


What a card: This is Rod Scurry's final card with the Pirates. He was purchased by the Yankees in September 1985.

My observation on the front: Given Scurry's harrowing, drug-filled 1984 season, I can't imagine what's going through his head here.

More opinion from me: Scurry's 1984 season included the following: drug use, a substance abuse rehab stint, public admission of taking cocaine, visits from the FBI, revealing to the authorities a network of dealers peddling drugs to National League players, and finally falling off the wagon and asking for a high-ball of cocaine from his hospital room while recovering from knee surgery that fall. I read about the Pittsburgh drug trial in the newspaper in 1985, but I was never really aware of how crazy it all was.

Something you might know: Scurry broke out big in 1982 by appearing in 76 games for the Pirates and posting a 1.74 ERA. But drug use killed his career and he died from a cocaine-induced heart attack at age 36 in 1992.

Something you might not know: Scurry's public admission of using cocaine in May 1984 came about after a drug-fueled disaster while the Pirates were in L.A. for a road series. Scurry had cocaine smuggled into a newly delivered baseball glove, went out partying while his teammates slept, and started hallucinating when he returned, tearing his room and TV apart in a rage because he thought cameras were planted in it.


My observation on the back: The Rangers led the league in saves in 2016 with 56. It doesn't mean much. The Cubs were 22nd and the Indians 24th in that category in 2016 and they played each other in the World Series.

The blog wants to speak now: The Ballgames category is updated.

Friday, March 17, 2017

#640 - Steve Henderson


What a card: Steve Henderson was coming off his second and final season with the Mariners when this card was issued. It was his last year as a regular starter. He signed with the A's in the offseason.

My observation on the front: Henderson has that look of a guy who thinks he hit the ball well ... aaaaand it's foul.

More opinion from me: Henderson wore the No. 5 for most of his career, which is impressive to me as he played for several teams and I'd think that number would have been taken, maybe even retired. Not with the Mariners in 1985, of course, but maybe the Mets, A's or Astros?

Something you might know: Henderson was the most notable player among the four traded to the Mets for Tom Seaver in the famed "Midnight Massacre" in June 1977. He was also traded for Dave Kingman.

Something you might not know: When Henderson arrived with the Mets, pitcher Jerry Koosman promised him that every time Henderson got two hits in a game, Koosman would serve Henderson his postgame meal.


My observation on the back: Another example of 1985 Topps lowering their standards for a card with a number ending in zero. There's nothing about Henderson's '84 stats that merit that. You'd have to go back to 1980 for that.

The blog wants to speak now: The News category is updated. The TV category is also updated (retroactively to Nov. 11).

Wednesday, March 15, 2017

#639 - Ed Hodge


What a card: This is Ed Hodge's only Topps card. (Fleer honored him with two cards, while Donruss ignored him).

My observation on the front: That scene behind Hodge -- I miss summer so much. Maybe it's the two feet of snow that fell yesterday.

More opinion from me: For crying out loud, are there PICNICS going on in the background?

Something you might know: After five-plus seasons in the minors, Hodge pitched his only season in the majors in 1984, appearing in 25 games for the Twins, starting 15 of them.

Something you might not know: Hodge became a police officer after his playing career and worked as a cop for eight years in Johnson City, Tenn. He says he once was almost blown up in a fire during his police career.


My observation on the back: OK, this is it: card No. 639, that's the point when the trivia quiz writer ran out of questions.

The blog wants to speak now: The Pop Culture tab is updated.

Monday, March 13, 2017

#638 - Mike Pagliarulo


What a card: This is Mike Pagliarulo's rookie card.

My observation on the front: Pre-mustache Pagliarulo looks odd to me.

More opinion from me: I will always associate Pagliarulo with former Yankees announcer Phil Rizzuto fawning over him during broadcasts early in the career of "Pags". Rizzuto, no doubt, felt a kinship with a young infielder with an Italian background. But it got a little nauseating.

Something you might know: Pagliarulo, who platooned with Scott Leius at third base for the Twins during the team's World Series triumph in 1991, was named the Marlins' hitting coach this offseason, replacing Barry Bonds.

Something you might not know: Pagliarulo notably called out Tony Gwynn in the press when the two were Padres teammates in 1990. Gwynn drew criticism from a few teammates that year as they perceived him as caring only about his own stats. Pagliarulo was interviewed in a New York Daily News article, saying, "He doesn't give a ---- about his team and that's weak. Donnie (Mattingly) would have kicked that guy's ass the first day." Although Gwynn wasn't named in the article, he took those words and the other criticism to heart during a trying season for the Hall of Famer.


My observation on the back: Pagliarulo's father played in Class C and D ball for the Cubs for one year in New Mexico and Idaho.

The blog wants to speak now: The News category is updated.

Thursday, March 9, 2017

#637 - Brett Butler


What a card: This is Brett Butler's first flagship Topps card as a Cleveland Indian after appearing as an Indian in the 1984 Topps Traded set.

My observation on the front: Brett seems mildly amused.

More opinion from me: Remember when the comedian Brett Butler started getting famous and then had her own sitcom, "Grace Under Fire"? When you mentioned Brett Butler during the mid-1990s, half the time people thought you were referring to the comedian. I didn't find her or her show entertaining, so I was never referring to her when I said "Brett Butler," dammit.

Something you might know: Known as one of the top leadoff hitters of his era, Butler came back from cancer of the tonsils to play for the Dodgers in 1996.

Something you might not know: Butler holds the MLB mark for most career bunt hits with the bases empty with 188.


My observation on the back: I wonder whether Rose is still Butler's idol?

The blog wants to speak now: The News category is updated.

Tuesday, March 7, 2017

#636 - Shane Rawley


What a card: This is Shane Rawley's first Topps card as a Phillie. He was traded from the Yankees to the Phillies on July 1, 1984 for pitcher Marty Bystrom.

My observation on the front: Rawley is posing in Dodger Stadium, which means the photo was taken while the Phillies were in L.A. from Aug. 17-19, 1984. Rawley pitched the win in the series-finale on Aug. 19.

More opinion from me: Rawley was one of my favorite Mariners from the early Seattle years. I was annoyed when he was traded to the Yankees at the start of the 1982 season.

Something you might know: Rawley started out as an effective reliever for fledgling Seattle, but gradually became a starter while with New York and Philadelphia and won 17 games for the Phillies in 1987.

Something you might not know: During Rawley's injury-plagued years with the Yankees, he was placed on the disabled list in May of 1984. The Yankees tried to hide a shoulder injury by saying he was going on the DL with a "strained sinus."


My observation on the back: That Vander Meer trivia answer may be correct forever.

The blog wants to speak now: The News category is updated.

Friday, March 3, 2017

#635 - Terry Kennedy


What a card: This is Terry Kennedy's second card in this set. He appeared in the Father-Son subset earlier.

My observation on the front: Dick Williams sighting in the dugout!

More opinion from me: I'm saying that's a foul ball.

Something you might know: Kennedy drove in two runs with a double in his first World Series at-bat in Game 1 of the 1984 World Series.

Something you might not know: Kennedy was Rickey Henderson's last manager on a pro team. Kennedy managed the inaugural season of the San Diego Surf Dawgs, an independent league team, in 2005. Interestingly, Kennedy was the catcher Henderson hounded during the 1989 World Series.


My observation on the back: Oh, come on! You devoted an entire card to the fact that Bob is Terry's father already!

The blog wants to speak now: The Ballgames category is updated. I'm going to spoil the surprise though by saying Nov. 18, 1985 has to be the most interesting day I've come across since writing this blog. A list of what happened on that date:

-- President Reagan and Russia's Mikhail Gorbachev begin their first summit meeting
-- Willie McGee wins the NL MVP award
-- Howard Stern begins a 20-year run at WXRK in New York
-- Olympic track gold medalist Allyson Felix is born
-- Jesus and Mary Chain's "Psychocandy" is released
-- Lawrence Taylor breaks Redskins QB's Joe Theismann in a graphic injury on Monday Night Football
-- Comic strip Calvin & Hobbes debuts in newspapers
-- For the first time, Snuffleupagus is visible to all characters on Sesame Street, not just Big Bird

Maybe that's only fascinating to me, but that's one hell of a day.

Wednesday, March 1, 2017

#634 - Bill Dawley


What a card: Bill Dawley was entering 1985 after a terrific first two major league seasons when this card was issued. In 1984, Dawley won 11 games in relief and posted a 1.93 earned run average.

My observation on the front: The Astros logo is the most interesting element on this card ... by far. The '85 set really has some boring cards.

More opinion from me: Those rainbow shoulder stripes -- I wonder who thought of that?

Something you might know: Dawley, after toiling in the minors for seven years, blasted out of the gate with Houston, posting a 1.83 ERA his rookie season in 1983, winning a spot on the National League's All-Star roster. He was the reliever called in after the Giants' Atlee Hammaker gave up that grand slam to the Angels' Fred Lynn.

Something you might not know: Dawley was a victim of major league baseball team's decisions to cut rosters from 25 men to 24 men in 1986. On April 1, 1986, Dawley and other established players like the Yankees' Phil Niekro, the Royals' Pat Sheridan and the Brewers' Ray Burris were cut to meet the 24-man limit. The 24-man roster wasn't expected to last more than a couple months, but it lasted through the 1989 season until the 25-man roster was written into the collective bargaining agreement in 1990.


My observation on the back: That "Did Not Pitch" for Tuscon is odd. Dawley started with the Astros out of spring training and was never sent down in 1983. So why would Tucson even be shown? (It's not shown on his baseball-reference page).

The blog wants to speak now: The News category is updated.

Monday, February 27, 2017

#633 - Glenn Hoffman


What a card: Glenn Hoffman was in comeback mode when this card was issued. He lost his starting job to Jackie Gutierrez in 1984 and sat the bench for most of the season.

My observation on the front: Hoffman appears to have lost his right hand.

More opinion from me: Hoffman's inability to hit, particularly early in his career, did not go unnoticed in my household when I was growing up. He was the subject of a bit of derision.

Something you might know: Hoffman is the older brother of one of the best closers in history, Trevor Hoffman.

Something you might not know: Hoffman's career was undermined by cardiac issues that were discovered in 1986 after he experienced repeated faintness. He was cut by the Red Sox in 1987. (He later played for the Dodgers in '87 and the Angels in '89).


My observation on the back: The trivia question isn't quite clear. The record McCovey tied was most hits in a major league debut (4).

The blog wants to speak now: The Pop Culture tab is updated.

Thursday, February 23, 2017

#632 - Bruce Bochte


What a card: This card marks Bruce Bochte's return to major league baseball. He took the entire 1983 season off. Depending on what you read, it was because he was disturbed by escalating players salaries or by baseball's management system.

My observation on the front: A rather pleasing card. For the most part only three colors in play, yellow, green and brown. (And white, for those of you who believe it's a color).

More opinion from me: Bochte is a pretty fascinating character. A deep-thinker, well-read person who cared about environmental causes during his career and even more fiercely after his career. These are the players that I'd love to write stories about, probably in an attempt to understand them.

Something you might know: Bochte's most successful years were with the Mariners. He was an All-Star in 1979 when he knocked in 100 runs and batted .316 in 150 games.

Something you might not know: Bochte is on the short list of people who may have coined the phrase "the Mendoza Line." Others on that list are teammate Tom Paciorek and the Royals' George Brett.


My observation on the back: Thanks to a handy updated article, I know that Bochte's daughters names are Sara and Dana and they are from his first marriage. His current wife is Pamela.

The blog wants to speak now: The Pop Culture tab is updated.

Tuesday, February 21, 2017

#631 - Bob Forsch


What a card: Bob Forsch missed much of the 1984 season when he underwent back surgery. He appeared in just 16 games. But he came back to appear with the Cardinals in the 1985 World Series and won 14 games in 1986.

My observation on the front: The background is tilted. You see that a lot in '70s cards, but I haven't seen much of it in this set.

More opinion from me: I blogged about Forsch on my '75 Topps blog. His rookie card was that year. Seeing him age from that point makes me feel old. Of course, Forsch died more than five years ago and that really makes me feel old.

Something you might know: Forsch won 20 games for the Cardinals his fourth year in the league in 1977. He also threw two no-hitters.

Something you might not know: Larry Dierker was a teammate of Forsch's brother, Ken, on the Astros and a fellow pitcher. Once when the Astros started a series against the Cardinals, Ken asked Bob if he could borrow one of Bob's bats. Bob gave him a bat. In the second game of the series, Bob was pitching. Dierker came to the plate and hit a home run off of Bob. The following year, Dierker joined the Cardinals. In spring training, Dierker came up to Bob and told him he hit the home run off of Bob with the bat Bob gave Ken. So, to sum up, Dierker hit a homer off of Bob with Bob's own bat.


My observation on the back: They're still the only brother pair to throw no-hitters. Both of their no-hitters happened in April. Bob's came in the ninth game of the season and Ken's in the second game of the season.

The blog wants to speak now: The Pop Culture tab is updated.

Friday, February 17, 2017

#630 - Tim Raines


What a card: Tim Raines was utilized more during the 1984 season than he had to that point in his career. He played in a career-high 160 games and set career highs for hits (192) and double (38).

My observation on the front: It must be very cold wherever Raines is.

More opinion from me: This really is one of Raines' best cards. I compiled a list of my 10 favorite Raines cards recently and this didn't quite make the cut, but come on, he played for 23 years and most of the 1990s. The guy has A LOT of cards.

Something you might know: You might know that he is one of only three people who can say they were elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame in 2017.

Something you might not know: Raines is one of four major leaguers to steal a base in four different decades. The other three are Rickey Henderson, Ted Williams and Omar Vizquel.


My observation on the back: Retiring a number for an owner is goofy.

The blog wants to speak now: The TV category is updated.

Wednesday, February 15, 2017

#629 - Dick Schofield


What a card: This is Dick Schofield's first base Topps card. He appears in the 1984 Topps Traded set as well as in Donruss' 1984 set.

My observation on the front: No matter how experienced a major league player is, catch him staring through a chain-link fence and he always looks like a kid who wants to get in the game.

More opinion from me: Really one of the best cards in the set.

Something you might know: Schofield was the starting shortstop for the Angels during the mid-to-late 1980s. His home run off of Oil Can Boyd during Game 3 of the 1986 ALCS helped the Angels take a 2-1 lead in that series.

Something you might not know: Scofield's first manager in professional baseball was current Cubs manager Joe Maddon. It was 1981. Maddon was in his first managing job with Rookie League Idaho Falls.


My observation on the back: Schofield is a member of one of five three-generation MLB families. The Nationals' Jayson Werth is his nephew.

The blog wants to speak now: The Ballgames category is updated.