Friday, August 18, 2017

#693 - Tim Stoddard


What a card: Tim Stoddard had completed his one and only season with the Cubs when this card was issued. He would sign in the offseason with the team that beat Chicago in the NLCS in 1984, the Padres.

My observation on the front: I don't know what's going on with Stoddard here. He looks all red-faced and worn out like he just ran laps in that jacket.

More opinion from me: My guess is the first very tall pitcher I knew was J.R. Richard. But Stoddard had to be not far after that. His height was very impressive in the '79 World Series.

Something you might know: Stoddard was the Orioles' closer in 1980 after Don Stanhouse signed with the Dodgers. Stoddard saved 26 games that season.

Something you might not know: Stoddard played a part in the end of UCLA's seven straight NCAA basketball championships. He and his North Carolina State teammates beat UCLA in the Final Four in 1974 and Stoddard was one of the key defenders on UCLA star Bill Walton.


My observation on the back: Tough question there.

The blog wants to speak now: The Pop Culture tab is updated.

Wednesday, August 16, 2017

#692 - Randy Bush


What a card: Randy Bush continued to be a regular platoon player in right and left field and the Twins' main pinch-hitter in 1984. He tied for the American League pinch-hitting lead by going 8-for-20 (.400).

My observation on the front: That looks like a very pleasant spring training day.

More opinion from me: The Twins' red hats are 😍.

Something you might know: Bush is one of seven players to appear on both World Championship Twins teams in 1987 and 1991.

Something you might not know: Bush once hit a home run that traveled more than 200 miles. While playing in the minor leagues for Toledo during a road game against Charleston in 1982, Bush blasted a shot over the right field wall that landed on moving coal train. The train traveled 200 more miles with the ball until coming to a rest.


My observation on the back: I miss watching televised games from County Stadium.

The blog wants to speak now: The News category is updated.

Monday, August 14, 2017

#691 - Dennis Rasmussen


What a card: This is Dennis Rasmussen's first Topps card. He appears in the 1984 Donruss set with the Padres.

My observation on the front: I think you get a good idea that Rasmussen is 6-foot-7 from this card.

More opinion from me: I remember Rasmussen winning 18 games for the Yankees in 1985 and thinking "who the heck is this guy?"

Something you might know: Rasmussen came to the Yankees in the trade that sent Graig Nettles to the Padres. Nettles claims he was dealt because George Steinbrenner didn't like the third basemen's just-published book, "Balls".

Something you might not know: Rasmussen played college basketball for Creighton University. In 1978, Rasmussen's Creighton team played Larry Bird's Indiana State team three times ... and won all three games.


My observation on the back: Bill Brubaker played infield for the Pirates in the mid-1930s.

The blog wants to speak now: The Pop Culture tab is updated.

Thursday, August 10, 2017

#690 - Alan Trammell


What a card: Alan Trammell had reached another level in 1983 and 1984, batting .319 and .314, respectively. Still, it was a prelude to his monster 1987 season.

My observation on the front: This card seems to sum up Trammell: solid, unspectacular, quietly effective, and I really have nothing else to say about it.

More opinion from me: Still annoyed at Trammell for being a Diamondbacks coach when they had that fight with the Dodgers. I probably should let that go, but I'm still waiting for the Diamondbacks to be contracted first.

Something you might know: Part of the longest continuous double play combination in MLB history (with Lou Whitaker), Trammell is one of the players often cited for Hall of Fame enshrinement. He was the MVP of the 1984 World Series.

Something you might not know: When Trammell was a kid growing up in San Diego, he attended Padres games. Once, when the Padres were playing the Pirates, he and a friend got Pirates coach and Hall of Famer Bill Mazeroski to play catch with them on the field.


My observation on the back: John Denny's win was in Game 1 of the World Series, a 2-1 victory for the Phillies.

The blog wants to speak now: The News category is updated.

Tuesday, August 8, 2017

#689 - Luis DeLeon


What a card: Luis DeLeon's playing time and performance took a dive in 1984. After two solid seasons of 60-plus games for the Padres, DeLeon managed just 32 games in 1984 and an ERA of 5.48. He didn't make it onto the Padres' postseason roster.

My observation on the front: Love those sky blue backdrops.

More opinion from me: With the Padres' letters obscured on DeLeon's uniform, he looks like he's just wearing a loud shirt.

Something you might know: DeLeon finished fifth in the NL Rookie of the Year voting in 1982 as he saved 15 games for San Diego. He split save opportunities with Gary Lucas in 1982 and 1983.

Something you might not know: Luis is one of four brothers named Luis (his father is named Luis, too). DeLeon was called "Mambo" to distinguish him from his brothers.


My observation on the back: Brother Luis played in the Boston and Cleveland organizations. Desiderio played in the Expos organization.

The blog wants to speak now: The Pop Culture tab is updated.

Friday, August 4, 2017

#688 - Len Matuszek


What a card: Len Matuszek had already moved on to the Blue Jays (and then the Dodgers) when this card was issued. But in 1984, he appeared in more than 100 games for the first time in his career.

My observation on the front: That is a player standing ramrod straight.

More opinion from me: I was a little too gleeful when the Dodgers acquired Matuszek (for Al Oliver for crying out loud!). I don't know why I expected big things from him.

Something you might know: Matuszek took over as the Phillies' starting first baseman from Pete Rose, who was released after the 1983 season. But Matuszek lasted just the one season.

Something you might not know: Matuszek was a full-time caregiver for a mentally handicapped man named Andy as of 11 years ago. This story about it is awesome.


My observation on the back: The Pirates still have lost the most LCS but the total is now seven. The Braves, Cardinals and Dodgers are tied for second with six. The highest total in the American League is five, proving that the most heartache is in the NL.

The blog wants to speak now: The News category is updated.

Wednesday, August 2, 2017

#687 - Bill Gullickson


What a card: Bill Gullickson was coming off his third straight double-figure victory season for the Expos when this card was issued. He'd hit double figures again in 1985 with 14 wins for Montreal.

My observation on the front: I love this card. It's a throwback to cards from the '70s with a true baseball background. It's spring training and you can find a player or two, possibly some reporters and, of course, fans.

More opinion from me: I don't remember if Gullickson or Catfish Hunter was the first athlete that I knew of having diabetes. (Ron Santo is probably the most notable baseball diabetic but he played before I started following sports). I do remember when news came out that Gullickson had Type 1 diabetes.

Something you might know: Gullickson set a rookie record for the most strikeouts in a game when he fanned 18 Cubs in 1980. He kept the record until the Cubs' Kerry Wood struck out 20 in 1998.

Something you might not know: Each of Gullickson's six children have a first name starting with "C" -- Callie, Carley, Cassie, Chelsey, Chloe and Craig.


My observation on the front: The word "traveling" has just one "l" unless you're in Great Britain. In the U.S., multi-syllable words in which the stress is on the first syllable do not feature a doubled final consonant when adding "-ing" or "-ed". Meanwhile, British writing favors longer words so the consonants are automatically doubled. And there's your grammar lesson on your baseball card blog.

The blog wants to speak now: The News category is updated.

Monday, July 31, 2017

#686 - Mike Easler


What a card: Mike Easler was coming off his most productive season when this card was issued. Provided the most playing time since beginning in the majors in 1973, Easler made the best of it, recording a career-high 188 hits, 27 homers and 91 RBIs.

My observation on the front: Easler appears to be saying to someone in the dugout, "hey man, I can't hit when no one is watching."

More opinion from me: I can't be the only one who spent several years wishing Easler would get more playing time. He always seemed to hit, yet received sporadic at-bats for the first half of his career.

Something you might know: "The Hit Man" batted .338 for the Pirates in 1980 in his breakout season. He parlayed his hitting success into a career as a hitting coach after his playing days ended.

Something you might not know: When Easler was traded from the Red Sox to the Yankees in 1986, it was the first time in history a trade included nothing but designated hitters.


My observation on the back: Easler did not receive a card of his own until 1980 (he did appear on a four-player rookie card in the 1978 Topps set). Look at all those years listed before he received a card!

The blog wants to speak now: The News category is updated.

Thursday, July 27, 2017

#685 - Bill Caudill


What a card: Bill Caudill was coming off his only All-Star season when this card was issued. He saved a career-high 36 games, which was second in the AL only to Dan Quisenberry's 44 in 1984.

My observation on the front: Caudill appears much too cheerful to be delivering a pitch here. It could be a grimace, I suppose.

More opinion from me: You can't beat Caudill's 1981 Topps card.

Something you might know: Caudill was famed sports agent Scott Boras' first client. Boras oversaw Caudill's five-year deal with the Blue Jays in 1985.

Something you might not know: Caudill's Boras-negotiated contract also said that Caudill could appear in a Blue Jays uniform for promotional or commercial purposes as long as the Blue Jays approved. It was the first time this common contract provision was added.


My observation on the back: This story from 1982 said that Caudill also featured a Sherlock Holmes-style pipe. The deerstalker cap mentioned in that article is a Sherlock Holmes-style hat.

The blog wants to speak now: The Pop Culture tab is updated.

Monday, July 24, 2017

#684 - Bill Doran


What a card: Bill Doran was coming off his sophomore season with the Astros (although he did play 26 games for the Astros in 1982) when this card was issued. He was firmly entrenched at second, appearing in more than 140 games for the second straight year.

My observation on the front: I spy dirt on Doran's uniform, which is appropriate for his style of play.

More opinion from me: The Astros never seemed to have a long-lasting second baseman until Doran came along. I didn't start following baseball until 1975 so I missed Houston's earlier history, but for years it was a rotating door at second with Rafael Landestoy, Art Howe, Joe Morgan, Phil Garner, etc.

Something you might know: Doran was the NL West champion Astros' starting second baseman in 1986 and set a bunch of career highs in 1987, his best season.

Something you might not know: Doran missed out playing on a World Series-winning team in 1990 after being dealt to Cincinnati in an August deadline deal that year. He played in 17 games for the Reds but then underwent back surgery that finished his season. He was checking into the hospital the same day the Reds clinched the NL West pennant.


My observation on the back: It's hard for me to picture mid-1980s baseball players selling insurance.

The blog wants to speak now: The News category is updated.

Thursday, July 20, 2017

#683 - Whitey Herzog


What a card: The Cardinals in 1984 completed their second straight average season after Whitey Herzog led St. Louis to the World Series championship in 1982. But it was an improvement over the disappointing '83 season and the Cardinals were on their way back to the Series in '85.

My observation on the front: I am intrigued by the jersey Herzog is wearing under his jacket. Is that a navy blue Cardinals jersey? Different.

More opinion from me: No doubt, Herzog knew how to manage. But he was the beginning of my dislike of Cardinals managers. He had this air about him like he would go off if someone said the wrong thing (I'm basing this mostly on an on-air scolding he gave Marv Albert during the NBC Game of the Week so maybe I'm being unfair). He seemed extra bossy.

Something you might know: During a golden age of naming a team's style of play after the manager, Herzog's style was called "Whiteyball," and its focus on speed and defense led the Cardinals to three World Series between 1982-87.

Something you might not know: George Scott played for the Royals and Herzog during the end of his career  in 1979. They got into a famous expletive-filled argument during a team meeting at Comiskey Park in Chicago. It was the first Royals team meeting for recent call-up Dan Quisenberry. After the meeting, Quisenberry asked pitcher Paul Splittorff "Are all your meetings like that?"


My observation on the back: I like the use of "skipper."

The blog wants to speak now: The News category is updated.

Tuesday, July 18, 2017

#682 - Doug Corbett


What a card: A bullpen sensation his first two years with Twins, Doug Corbett enjoyed a comeback season in 1984, appearing in 44 games in relief with a 2.12 ERA.

My observation on the front: You can see Corbett's set-up for his sinkerball in this photo. Corbett featured an interesting delivery in which his arm formed an "L" shape before he released the ball side-armed.

More opinion from me: The Twins featured a great group of rookies in the early '80s with Hrbek, Corbett, Viola, Castino, Ward and Gaetti. We had no idea at the time that most of them would lead to 2 World Series titles in five years, probably because we all thought Tim Laudner was going to be the best of the bunch.

Something you might know: Corbett was part of a wave of sidearming relievers that included Dan Quisenberry and Kent Tekulve. He saved 40 games for the Twins over 1980 and 1981. He's also known for getting the Twins Tom Brunansky in a deal with the Angels.

Something you might not know: When Corbett was granted free agency by the Angels after the 1986 season, the team still featured a pitching Corbett in rookie Sherman Corbett. When Sherman Corbett arrived at spring training camp in 1987, he found a new uniform with his name on it at his locker. Impressed, he tried it on ... and it didn't fit. The 6-foot-4 Sherman Corbett was trying on the old uniform of the 6-1 Doug Corbett.


My observation on the back: One of the Corbett's twin sons, Jason, suffered a collapsed lung a month after birth and nearly died.

The blog wants to speak now: The News category is updated.

Friday, July 14, 2017

#681 - Ben Oglivie


What a card: Ben Oglivie had just completed what would be his final full-time season when this card was issued. After 1984, Oglivie barely managed 100 games in his last two seasons.

My observation on the front: Oglivie has a lot of interesting and fun cards. This is not one of them.

More opinion for me: Thanks to benchwarmer Ogilvie in the "Bad News Bears," I thought Oglivie's name was pronounced and spelled like the "booger-eatin' moron" in the movie for YEARS. I still have difficulty spelling Ben's name properly. It's "OGL" not "OGI".

Something you might know: Oglivie is the first non-U.S. born player to lead the league in home runs. He tied for the AL home run lead with Reggie Jackson when both hit 41 in 1980.

Something you might not know: Oglivie could start and finish the New York Times crossword puzzle in under five minutes.


My observation on the back: Oglivie was also given the politically incorrect nickname of "Banana Man" by a coach for the Tigers, Joe Schultz (the former Pilots manager).

The blog wants to speak now: Another early morning for the night owl, so I'll pass.

Wednesday, July 12, 2017

#680 - Jerry Reuss


What a card: Jerry Reuss was coming off an injury-plagued 1984 season when this card was released. He underwent offseason surgery to remove bone spurs from both heels.

My observation on the front: A baseball card that doesn't show Jerry Reuss smiling is not a baseball card of Jerry Reuss.

More opinion from me: Reuss did two things that solidified him as one of my favorite players of all-time: he signed and returned a couple of cards to me, and he commented on my blog. And he was already a favorite when he pitched for the Dodgers.

Something you might know: Reuss started the 1975 All-Star Game while with the Pirates and pitched three innings. His best season was probably in 1980 with the Dodgers when he finished second in the Cy Young Award voting and pitched a no-hitter against the Giants. He also was the NL Comeback Player of the Year.

Something you might not know: Reuss was traded from the Cardinals to the Astros at the start of the 1972 season because Cardinals owner August Busch didn't like Reuss' mustache.


My observation on the back: Reuss is a music fan and apparently put together a music reference book in the early 1990s that helped readers find music from 1955-79 on compact discs.

The blog wants to speak now: The Movies category is updated.

Monday, July 10, 2017

#679 - Bob Kearney


What a card: Bob Kearney was coming off the most playing time he'd enjoy in a single season, appearing in 133 games in his first season with the Mariners in 1984.

My observation on the front: Kearney looks like a big man in some of his other cards, although not so much here. He is listed as 6-feet, 180 pounds, so this is probably an accurate representation.

More opinion from me: Kearney replaced Rick Sweet as the Mariners' starting catcher, which reminds me of just how much Seattle struggled with personnel in their first decade.

Something you might know: Kearney was named the catcher on Topps' All-Rookie Team in 1983. Sadly, Topps wasn't displaying rookie cups on its cards at the time and Kearney missed out.

Something you might not know: Kearney didn't connect with some of his pitchers regarding pitch selection and it came out in the papers after Mariners pitcher Ed Vande Berg was traded to the Dodgers for catcher Steve Yeager. Vande Berg called Kearney a "rockhead," and Kearney responded by saying of Vande Berg, "It's nice to have a good arm but you need to use your noodle a little bit, too."


My observation on the back: I'm coming up with dead-ends on the Mr. San Antonio and substitute teacher references, so I'll just say the trivia question makes me sad.

The blog wants to speak now: The News category is updated.

Thursday, July 6, 2017

#678 - Joey McLaughlin


What a card: This is Joey McLaughlin's final card for Topps. He was released by the Rangers at the end of the 1984 season.

My observation on the front: What a way to go out! That's a nice, tight look at the mammoth eyewear that was in fashion during the 1980s.

More opinion from me: I got Bo McLaughlin and Joey McLaughlin confused since they were pitchers in the majors at about the same time. And when I figured out they were different people, I couldn't believe they weren't related. (There was also a pitcher named Byron McLaughlin at that time. For whatever reason, I was able to tell him apart).

Something you might know: McLaughlin spent most of his career with the Blue Jays, leading the team in saves with 10 in strike-shortened 1981.

Something you might not know: McLaughlin's first major league appearance, his first major league start, lasted all of six batters. On June 11, 1977, he started against the Phillies, giving up a single and two walks to his first three batters. Greg Luzinski then hit a grand slam for a 4-0 lead. McLaughlin retired Davey Johnson on a fly ball, but then Garry Maddox hit a home run and McLaughlin was replaced with Steve Kline.


My observation on the back: I missed posting on McLaughlin's birthday by five days.

The blog wants to speak now: The News category is updated.

Tuesday, July 4, 2017

#677 - Wally Backman


What a card: Wally Backman was coming off a breakthrough season when this card was issued. He had disappeared off of cards in 1984, but won the starting second base job that season and appeared in more than 100 games for the first time in his career, batting .280.

My observation on the front: You can see Backman's slap-hitting style in this photo as evidenced by his bat follow-through. He liked to go the opposite way.

More opinion from me: Backman was one of several rascally guys on the '86 Mets. I envisioned Backman and teammate Len Dykstra engaged in endless expletive-filled spitting contests when they weren't playing. I don't know if that's true, but it seems about right.

Something you might know: Backman and fellow infielder Tim Teufel were known as the table-setters for the New York Mets during their 1986 championship season. Backman hit .300 twice during his career, once in 1986 and once in 1988 (he also did so in 1980 but in only 93 at-bats).

Something you might not know: Backman ranked among the top 10 best baseball rants in a Sports Illustrated article last month. Backman's tirade was aired during a documentary on the independent league team he managed, the South Georgia Peanuts, which lasted just one season. The rant is NSFW.


My observation on the back: Dave Kingman's grand slam came on July 31, 1971 off of the Pirates' Dave Giusti in the bottom of the seventh inning. It was part of a seven-run seventh in an eventual 15-11 victory for the Giants.

The blog wants to speak now: The News category is updated.

Friday, June 30, 2017

#676 - Albert Hall


What a card: This is Albert Hall's rookie card after he received the most playing time of his career to this point in 1984, appearing in 87 games for the Braves.

My observation on the front: The Braves seem to be playing an exhibition game against the Royals judging by the photo background.

More opinion from me: When Albert Hall reached the majors, I couldn't listen to "A Day In The Life" by the Beatles the same way again. "Now they know how many holes it takes to fill the Albert Hall." Of course, the Beatles were singing about Royal Albert Hall in London.

Something you might know: Hall was the first Atlanta Brave to hit for the cycle. He tripled in his final at-bat to complete the feat on Sept.23, 1987 against the Astros.

Something you might not know: The MLB Players Association filed a grievance on the behalf of Hall in 1989, who was released by the Braves out of spring training less than a month after he sought treatment for alcohol abuse. After completing the program, he appeared in just two games for the Braves before he was released. The Players Union sought his reinstatement by the Braves. Hall ended up signing a minor league deal with the Pirates for the '89 season and appeared in 20 games for Pittsburgh.


My observation on the back: Of course, the new AL record for most saves in a season is Francisco Rodriguez with 62 in 2008, also the major league record.

The blog wants to speak now: The Pop Culture tab is updated.

Wednesday, June 28, 2017

#675 - Tony Perez


What a card: Tony Perez returned to a Reds uniform in the 1985 set after being out of the uniform in a flagship set since 1977 Topps.

My observation on the front: You see Perez here and it's easy to forget he ever played for the Expos, Red Sox or Phillies.

More opinion from me: Perez was known as an RBI machine during his heyday, so much so that it was drilled into my head. I wonder if Perez was at its peak today what they would say about him, since RBIs are not fashionable.

Something you might know: A key member of The Big Red Machine, Perez was elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame in 2000.

Something you might not know: Perez started his professional career as a second baseman. In his first season, with Single A Geneva, N.Y., he played at second until someone named Pete Rose arrived and Perez was moved to third base.


My observation on the back: Topps was being a little charitable by giving Perez a number ending in "5". Perez hadn't posted a strong season since 1980 (although he did bat .328 in 1985, maybe Topps knew something).

The blog wants to speak now: The News category is updated.

Monday, June 26, 2017

#674 - Atlee Hammaker


What a card: Atlee Hammaker missed most of the 1984 season after undergoing arthroscopic surgery on his rotator cuff. He appeared in six games, pitching just 33 innings.

My observation on the front: The fans behind Hammaker are waiting patiently for an autograph.

More opinion from me: Call it holding a grudge, but I will never get over Hammaker's 1983 All-Star Game performance that ended the National League's streak of 11 straight ASG victories and signaled the end of NL dominance.

Something you might know: Hammaker led the National League with a 2.25 ERA in 1983. That was also the year he gave up the only grand slam in All-Star Game history, to the Angels' Fred Lynn.

Something you might not know: The wife of Cleveland Indians catcher Yan Gomes is one of Hammaker's five daughters, Jenna.


My observation on the back: Quite a collection of '70s nicknames there: Mad Dog, Cobra and the Mad Hungarian.

The blog wants to speak now: Not today, it's another day of getting up too early.

Thursday, June 22, 2017

#673 - Buck Martinez


What a card: Buck Martinez appeared in 102 games for the Blue Jays in 1984, the first time in 15 seasons in the majors that he had appeared in 100 games in a season.

My observation on the front: An interesting choice of a photo, showing Martinez leading off. He stole five bases in 1,049 career games.

More opinion from me: Martinez played a long time, I have lots of cards of him, yet I associated him more with being a broadcaster than a player.

Something you might know: Martinez made one very memorable play at the plate in 1985. He was bowled over by the Mariners' Phil Bradley while making the tag out at the plate. He suffered a broken leg on the play, yet tried to throw out Gorman Thomas advancing on the bases. The throw went into left field and Thomas tried to go home, only to be tagged out by Martinez, who had received the throw from George Bell, despite the broken leg, for the double play.

Something you might not know: Martinez posted a lifetime .225 batting average. He said in a 1983 article that a hunting accident contributed to his inability to hit consistently. During the 1976 offseason, Martinez and Royals teammate and pitcher Doug Bird went hunting. Bird took a shot while he was behind Martinez and a pellet struck Martinez in the eye. His vision in his left eye was 20/200 since.


A word about the back: Martinez met Arlene in Puerto Rico when he was playing winter ball in 1971. But the two didn't see each other again for three more years during a party in Florida in spring training. That's when they started dating.

The blog wants to speak now: The Pop Culture tab is updated.

Tuesday, June 20, 2017

#672 - Juan Berenguer


What a card: Juan Berenguer was coming off his most successful major league season to date when this card was issued. After roaming from team to team with little success, he started 27 games and won 11 in 1984. But he never made an appearance in the Tigers' postseason.

My observation on the front: There appears to be a gathering of fans in the Tiger Stadium outfield stands, straining to see Berenguer's photo session.

More opinion from me: One of Berenguer's nicknames was "Señor Smoke," which was also Tigers pitching teammate Aurelio Lopez's nickname. I'm assuming Berenguer wasn't called that until after he left the Tigers. You can't have two Señor Smokes on the same team.

Something you might know: Berenguer became an effective relief pitcher for the Twins during the late 1980s, making his biggest impact during the Twins' ALCS victory over the Tigers in 1987.

Something you might not know: If you're a Twins fan, you know this, but as for the rest of you, Juan Berenguer starred in a music video called the "Berenguer Boogie," which riffed off his appearance in a trenchcoat when he arrived back in the Metrodome after the Twins' 1987 World Series win. The video is long (I linked to a shorter version on the making of the video) and very 1987, but 1987 ruled so I don't want to hear anything bad about it.


My observation on the back: Once again, some interesting abbreviations of the hometown in the vital info.

The blog wants to speak now: The TV category is updated.

Friday, June 16, 2017

#671 - Dane Iorg


What a card: Dane Iorg played in 78 games for the Royals in 1984 after being purchased from the Cardinals in May of that year. Iorg would come back and torment his old team in 1985.

My observation on the front: Iorg looks like he needs to wash his forehead.

More opinion from me: I feel proud that I grew up during a period when everyone knew how to pronounce Iorg's name.

Something you might know: Iorg drove in the winning run during the pivotal Game 6 of the 1985 World Series. After umpire Don Denkinger's controversial "safe" call on Jorge Orta in the ninth inning, the Royals load the bases while down 1-0 to the Cardinals. Iorg then delivered a two-run single to seal the game.

Something you might not know: Iorg and his brother, Garth, were the first brothers to play against each other in a League Championship Series when Dane's Royals faced Garth's Blue Jays in 1985.


My observation on the back: The Tigers' Placido Polanco now holds the record for consecutive chances without an error as a second baseman with a whopping 911 in comparison.

The blog wants to speak now: The Ballgames category is updated.

Wednesday, June 14, 2017

#670 - Tom Seaver


What a card: Tom Seaver enjoyed a revival with the White Sox in 1984. In his first season with Chicago, and in the American League, he won 15 games. He'd do even better in 1985, winning his 300th game in the process.

My observation on the front: This picture just says "old man" to me. I think older players should be shown out on the field. They're still in the game!

More opinion from me: There is almost nothing stranger than Seaver in a White Sox uniform. I was around when Seaver became a Cincinnati Red and that was weird, but I was also a kid then and relatively new to baseball. It wasn't quite the shock to me as it was for veteran fans. But "Seaver to the White Sox"? Whuuuuut?

Something you might know: Seaver was voted into the Hall of Fame in 1992 by a greater percentage than any Hall selection (98.84 percent) until  Ken Griffey Jr. surpassed it in 2016.

Something you might not know: Forty years ago today, Seaver contacted Mets general manager Joe McDonald to tell him to halt trade negotiations with the Reds because he was willing to accept an extension and remain a Met. Later, however, he read a column by the New York Daily News' Dick Young that enraged him so much that he demanded the trade that would become known as the Midnight Massacre, occurring on June 15, 1977.


My observation on the back: Seaver's book was published in 1984 and called "The Art of Pitching".

The blog wants to speak now: The Ballgames category is updated.

Monday, June 12, 2017

#669 - Lee Lacy


What a card: This is Lee Lacy's final card as a Pittsburgh Pirate. He had signed with the Orioles as a free agent by the time this card appeared in packs.

My observation on the front: Many of the Pirates cards in this set are alike. See if you can spot the similarities. And I'm not talking about them wearing the same uniform.

More opinion from me: I was a Lee Lacy backer when he was with the Dodgers. I wanted him to start, I was quite disappointed when he was traded to the Braves, and I was elated when he was traded back to L.A. and one of the first 1977 Topps Dodgers cards I pulled was Lee Lacy.

Something you might know: A pinch-hitting specialist with the Dodgers, he hit five pinch-hit home runs in 1978, including a record-setting three straight. He played in the World Series three straight years, in 1977 and 1978 with the Dodgers and 1979 with the Pirates.

Something you might not know: Lacy was once tagged out at second base on a walk to the next batter. Lacy was on first base when a 3-1 pitch was made to batter Omar Moreno during a game against the Reds. Lacy took off for second on the pitch, which was ball four. The second base ump called Lacy out on the tag, even though he was safe because of the walk. But Lacy didn't check the home ump's call and started trotting back to the dugout thinking he was out. When he spotted Moreno trotting to first on the walk, he tried to scramble back to second. But shortstop Davey Concepcion tagged him and the second base ump called Lacy out again.


My observation on the back: If that birth date for Lacy's son is correct, it means Lacy was 17 when his son was born. I'm going to say that date is wrong. Also, Lacy's daughter, Jennifer, who played in the WNBA, was born in 1983 but is not mentioned in the writeup.

The blog wants to speak now: The News category is updated.