Tuesday, October 17, 2017

#714 - Mike Schmidt All-Star


What a card: Mike Schmidt was coming off his seventh season of leading the league in home runs, socking 36 in 1984.

My observation on the front: Hey, we're back at spring training. Very nice.

More opinion from me: That's a good look at the Phillies' 100th anniversary patch. However, the Phillies' 100th anniversary was 1983, so this appears to be a picture of Schmidt that's more than a year old.

All-Star Game performance: Schmidt went 0-for-3 in the 1984 All-Star Game, striking out twice.

Legitimate All-Star card or fake All-Star card: It's legit. If it was the '80s, Schmidt was starting.


My observation on the back: Schmidt leads the league in home runs and RBIs so Topps goes with ... runs?

The blog wants to speak now: The News category is updated.

Friday, October 13, 2017

#713 - Ryne Sandberg All-Star


What a card: Ryne Sandberg hit a league-best and career-high 19 triples in 1984. His next-highest total during his career was eight.

My observation on the front: This is one of Sandberg's better baseball cards.

More opinion from me: Sandberg looks very young here, maybe the youngest he's looked on a major league card.

All-Star Game performance: Sandberg went 1-for-4 in the 1984 All-Star Game, reaching first on an infield single and stealing second base.

Legitimate All-Star card or fake All-Star card: Legitimate. Sandberg started the '84 game and played until the end.


My observation on the back: The two players tied with 173 hits are Dave Parker of the Reds and Johnny Ray of the Pirates.

The blog wants to speak now: The Pop Culture tab is updated.

Wednesday, October 11, 2017

#712 - Keith Hernandez All-Star


What a card: Keith Hernandez led the National League in double plays turned by a first baseman in 1984. It was the sixth and final season that he would top that category.

My observation on the front: Unlike the American League All-Stars, which I believe all feature photos from spring training, Hernandez is shown at a big-league park, Shea Stadium.

More opinion from me: This starts the National League portion of the All-Star Cards and there is no design or color differentiation between the AL and NL all-star cards, which actually irks me. Previous sets have noted the difference between the leagues.

All-Star Game performance: Keith Hernandez struck out in his only at-bat in the 1984 All-Star Game.

Legitimate All-Star card or fake All-Star card: Fake. Steve Garvey started at first base for the National League. Steve Garvey was deprived of an All-Star card.


My observation on the back: Quite the race for the On-Base Percentage King.

The blog wants to speak now: The Pop Culture tab is updated.

Monday, October 9, 2017

#711 - Dan Quisenberry All-Star


What a card: Dan Quisenberry led the league in saves for the third straight season in 1984 and finished second in the AL Cy Young Award voting for the second straight year.

My observation on the front: This is from the same photo shoot as Quisenberry's base card, probably just a few camera clicks away.

More opinion from me: The advertising signs in the background scream 1980s spring training.

All-Star Game performance: Quisenberry was selected to the AL All-Star team for the 1984 game but didn't play, probably because the AL trailed for the entire game and a closer wasn't needed.

Legitimate All-Star card or fake All-Star card: Fake. Relievers are never All-Star starters.


My observation on the back: A year after setting the record for most saves in a season, Quisenberry finished one save short of that mark in 1984.

The blog wants to speak now: I'm not here to start no trouble, but the Pop Culture tab is updated.

Thursday, October 5, 2017

#710 - Frank Viola All-Star


What a card: Frank Viola won 18 games for the Twins in 1984, his first season with double-figure victories.

My observation on the front: It's difficult to look around the 6-4 Viola to see if there are signs of a spring training site, but I'm going to assume he's in sunny Florida.

More opinion from me: It'd be more interesting if Viola's last name was pronounced like the musical string instrument. It didn't prevent people from calling him "Sweet Music" though.

All-Star Game performance: Dude wasn't even selected to play in the All-Star Game in 1984.

Legitimate All-Star card or fake All-Star card: DUDE WASN'T EVEN SELECTED TO PLAY IN THE ALL-STAR GAME. Topps really should have explained itself here.


My observation on the back: That "twelve players tied with 2" looks comical in today's pitching environment. There were 14 total shutouts in the American League in 2017.

The blog wants to speak now: The News category is updated.

Tuesday, October 3, 2017

#709 - Mike Boddicker All-Star


What a card: Mike Boddicker ranked among the top American League pitchers in 1984, leading the league in earned-run average (2.79) and victories (20).

My observation on the front: This spring training shot captures some of the crowd, right down to the standing dude in brown pants and some sort of checked shirt.

More opinion from me: Boddicker features the dark-haired good looks that the Orioles seemed to continuously churn out for its pitching staff during a period that began with Jim Palmer and ended with Mike Mussina.

All-Star performance: Boddicker was named to the AL All-Star pitching staff for the 1984 game but didn't get to play.

Legitimate All-Star card or fake All-Star card: Fake. The fact that Topps is narrowing it down to "right-handed" and "left-handed" categories tips you off that there's some tinkering going on. The right-handed Dave Stieb actually started the game but you have to go to Topps' glossy set to find an All-Star card of Stieb.


My observation on the back: Topps covers three of Boddicker's four shutouts in 1984. The one missing is from Sept. 9, 1984 when he shut out the Brewers.

The blog wants to speak now: The Pop Culture category is updated.